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Ok I am really getting into putting my own food up and preserving my husband's hard work.  Many things I would like to try involve a pressure cooker and I am at a loss.  Advice would be appreciated on types, brands and how tos.

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Most pressure canners will come with an instruction manual that includes the whole process. I've been really happy with my Presto Pressure Canner.
I inherited one from my parents :-) so it's nice and broken in...haven't started using it yet, and (of course) don't have the benefit of written instructions....anyone have luck good/bad using pressure canners on glass/flat-top stoves?
I've read that you can't use all canners on flat top stoves. They must be completely flat on the bottom. Also, you need to have your pressure canner tested if it's old. Well, technically you should have all canners tested once a year. I believe your local cooperative extension can help you find out how. They got through a great deal of stress on a regular basis and any flaw in it can cause it to explode. I accidentally dropped my pressure canner once and it was just enough to keep me from ever using it again other than for a boiling water canner.

Emily said:
I inherited one from my parents :-) so it's nice and broken in...haven't started using it yet, and (of course) don't have the benefit of written instructions....anyone have luck good/bad using pressure canners on glass/flat-top stoves?
I use and recomend "All American" canners. Their website is http://www.allamericancanner.com/ there are no rubber gaskets to fail and they are extremely durable. You can buy parts for them if needed from the manufacturer. They come in all different sizes. I would recomend buying one large enough to double stack pint jars at the very least. If you're gonna take the time to can you may as well have the abaility to can a "lot" at the same time! These canner are not cheap but you definately get what you pay for and the resale value is very high (check them out on Ebay). Whan I use my large canner I do it outside on a propane fish cooker becuas eit's lower to the ground and easier to take the jars out of. I use a small pressure canner to do test-batches of 4 pints on the stove top inside the house.
If you want to can in a pressure cooker, you need at least an 8-quart size, but the bigger the better, as long as your stove is big enough. All-American are the best, but quite expensive. I picked up mine (Mirro brand) on ebay and just had to buy a new rubber ring. I got the instruction manual online from the company website. Pressure canning isn't much different from hot water canning, it just sits longer in the canner =o) The Ball canning book is a great reference for how-to, and their website has lots of info too. Also try your local extension office, they can answer any questions and talk you through it if you find yourself overwhelmed in the middle of a project. P.S. don't buy a nonstick model, the teflon can't take the high heat.
Thank you to all who responded still contemplating

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